Graduate coursework

ANTH8032 Law, Order and Conflict in the Pacific

Course convenors - Nicole Haley & Sinclair Dinnen

The course will provide an introduction to key issues in law, order and conflict in Melanesia. Utilizing theoretical approaches drawn from the disciplines of anthropology, criminology and conflict studies, the course aims to equip students with tools to facilitate the analysis and understanding of social order and disorder. The application of these approaches will be demonstrated via the examination of case studies from Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu and Fiji. The course will explore contemporary debates including competing notions of social order; the role of state and non-state mechanisms in social control; internal and external responses to problems of law and order in the Asia Pacific region, and the dynamics of peace processes and post-conflict reconstruction throughout the region. In examining these topics, students will be exposed to a variety of perspectives from both academic and donor discourses.

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ANTH8043 Conflict and Development in the Pacific

Course convenors - Nicole Haley & Sinclair Dinnen

The course will explore contemporary debates regarding conflict and social disorder in the Pacific drawing on the research and policy work of members of the State Society and Governance in Melanesia (SSGM) Program in the College of Asia and the Pacific (CAP). Utilizing theoretical approaches drawn from the disciplines of anthropology, criminology and conflict studies, the course aims to equip students with tools to facilitate the analysis and understanding of social order and disorder. The practical implications of these approaches will be demonstrated via the examination of case studies from Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu and Fiji. The course will explore contemporary debates including competing notions of social order; the role of state and non-state mechanisms in social control; internal and external responses to problems of law and order in the Asia Pacific, and the dynamics of peace processes and post-conflict reconstruction throughout the region. In examining these topics, students will be exposed to a variety of perspectives including from academic, international donor, domestic government and civil society discourses.

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ANTH 8106 Gender, Nature and Development

Course convenor - Richard Eves

This course explores the links between gender, violence, and development in Melanesia and the Pacific. We introduce and critically examine concepts of violence - especially those used by development practitioners - and their usefulness for the region.

Each week, we look at pressing development issues in the region such as poverty and economic empowerment, political participation and human rights, sorcery and religious beliefs, rapid cultural change, urban migration, and health challenges, and we ask about the relationship of violence and gender to these challenges.

This course encourages students to ask questions such as, are development problems the source or the outcome of violence (or both)? How do men and women feature differently in violence and its effects? How are different groups and actors in the region trying to address violence and its effects? Our frames of reference for examining the links between gender, violence, and development include the state, the family, the village, and the urban neighbourhood in Melanesia and the Pacific.

We draw on the extensive academic and applied expertise of researchers in the ANU’s State, Society and Governance in Melanesia program. The course is meant for postgraduate students as well as practitioners interested in gender, development and violence in the region and beyond.

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INTR8043 The Post-Colonial Pacific and Global Change

Course convenor - Thiago Oppermann

This course explores the experience of the post-colonial states and societies of the Pacific with global political, strategic, cultural and economic processes. It examines the impact of such processes on the fragmentation and integration of political community, on development and poverty, cultural identity, conflict and governance, human security and sovereignty. It is particularly concerned with how global norms and ideas such as democracy, human rights, gender equity, sovereignty, statism and neo-liberal economics interact with the values and organisation of local societies. It situates the Pacific experience in a larger debate about the impact of ‘globalisation’ on developing states, and about the international system as viewed from non-western regions.

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PASI6006 War in the Islands: the Second World War in the Pacific

Course convenor - Vicki Luker

The extension of World War II to the Pacific Theatre in 1942 signalled a new era in the technology of war and profoundly shaped the modern history of the Asia Pacific region. This course is the first in the world to combine Allied, Japanese and Pacific Islander understandings of the Pacific War with particular attention to the South West Pacific. It complements the existing emphasis on the perspective from the United States and is distinctive in making ‘space’ for Islander experiences. Attention is divided equally between a narrative history of the events of conflict, and a multi-thematic consideration of the consequences and implications of World War II in the Islands. These legacies are addressed through issues as diverse as military technology and strategy, health and environment, Pacific Island lives and post-war political developments in the region. The course offers a fresh approach to a watershed in regional history, and should appeal to students in History, Peace and Conflict Studies, Pacific Studies, Asian Studies, Development Studies and International Relations.

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PASI8004 Pacific Health Challenges and Strategies: Politics, Culture and Development

Course convenors - Roannie Ng Shiu & Richard Eves

Health in the Pacific, and health of Pacific peoples, is a critical development concern for Pacific island governments, communities, and aid agencies, including Australia and the World Health Organization. This course examines health challenges as well as policy responses at the local, national, regional and global level. Drawing on SSGM’s expertise in Pacific societies and systems, and our training in political science, development studies, anthropology, population health, and indigenous health, this course is able to provide in-depth investigation of critical health issues in Pacific Island Countries. We begin by introducing approaches to health and health systems in the Pacific, then move through weekly country-specific case studies. Examples of case studies will include population politics, gender dimensions of health, HIV/AIDS, Non-communicable diseases, mental health challenges and substances, climate change and food security. In each case we ask what are the key contributors, what policies are trying to address these challenges, and how do culture, development and politics shape health challenges and responses. This course is ideal for students and/or practitioners who wish to better understand the critical health challenges in the Pacific including from policy, development, cultural, and governance perspectives. Those who currently work in the Pacific or wish to do so will benefit from detailed examination and understanding of major health issues and responses, while those students who are studying health will access unique Pacific content and case studies.

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Updated:  23 March 2016/Responsible Officer:  Su-Ann Tan/Page Contact:  CAP Web Team